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143 notes

jaketbrooks:

Today, a very familiar thing happened.
I’m reading a story  about Tina Brown by Peter Stevenson, the former executive editor of The  New York Observer. He was born to write this piece. It does not  disappoint. (“Under a black suit, she wore a white shirt unbuttoned  enough to display  the cleavage that inspired Private Eye to dub her a ‘buxom hackette’  when she was 25.” Nice.) And yet, I’m left wondering, what does this  piece look like in the magazine? It’s not that I want to see a pdf (yuck!) of  the magazine version or that I’m yearning for the tactile comfort of the printed page.  It’s that I’m bored. Not by the content, mind you, but by the design.  It’s a 5,000-word profile that probably involved weeks, if not months of  work, and cost the Times a nice chunk of change to produce, yet it’s  squeezed into the same template as practically every other piece of  content on nytimes.com. (Witness my incredibly helpful side-by-side  comparison of the Stevenson article with a 750-word piece about Michael  Bloomberg.)  
The why is fairly obvious—ease of production and  speed, advertising constraints, cost, competing functionalities, etc.  Templates serve an incredibly important function in online publishing.  It’s an integral part of any website that hopes to keep up with a daily  news cycle. And there’s nothing wrong with the template per se. It’s the  philosophy around templates that is wrong. Templates need to be more flexible to allow for the kind of creativity we have come to expect in print and, at this point, online.
How can we  expect readers to treat online content with the same amount of respect  and reverence as we do print content, if we don’t even try to treat it  with the same amount of attention to detail online as we do in print.  It’s time editorial sites start experimenting with more flexible  templates. 
This is not an issue of time,  mind you. At this point, a trained front-end developer, knowledgeable  in CSS, could lay out a custom article design as quickly as someone  trained in InDesign.
It’s an issue of money. (Isn’t it always?)  Publishers don’t want to pay for the personnel. They are expensive—just  like their print counterparts. They are also worried about the return on  investment, which is entirely fair. Why invest in more personnel when  even the most optimistic advertising projections can’t cover the cost?  The reason is that this is how you increase the value of your product.

jaketbrooks:

Today, a very familiar thing happened.

I’m reading a story about Tina Brown by Peter Stevenson, the former executive editor of The New York Observer. He was born to write this piece. It does not disappoint. (“Under a black suit, she wore a white shirt unbuttoned enough to display the cleavage that inspired Private Eye to dub her a ‘buxom hackette’ when she was 25.” Nice.) And yet, I’m left wondering, what does this piece look like in the magazine? It’s not that I want to see a pdf (yuck!) of the magazine version or that I’m yearning for the tactile comfort of the printed page. It’s that I’m bored. Not by the content, mind you, but by the design. It’s a 5,000-word profile that probably involved weeks, if not months of work, and cost the Times a nice chunk of change to produce, yet it’s squeezed into the same template as practically every other piece of content on nytimes.com. (Witness my incredibly helpful side-by-side comparison of the Stevenson article with a 750-word piece about Michael Bloomberg.)  

The why is fairly obvious—ease of production and speed, advertising constraints, cost, competing functionalities, etc. Templates serve an incredibly important function in online publishing. It’s an integral part of any website that hopes to keep up with a daily news cycle. And there’s nothing wrong with the template per se. It’s the philosophy around templates that is wrong. Templates need to be more flexible to allow for the kind of creativity we have come to expect in print and, at this point, online.

How can we expect readers to treat online content with the same amount of respect and reverence as we do print content, if we don’t even try to treat it with the same amount of attention to detail online as we do in print. It’s time editorial sites start experimenting with more flexible templates. 

This is not an issue of time, mind you. At this point, a trained front-end developer, knowledgeable in CSS, could lay out a custom article design as quickly as someone trained in InDesign.

It’s an issue of money. (Isn’t it always?) Publishers don’t want to pay for the personnel. They are expensive—just like their print counterparts. They are also worried about the return on investment, which is entirely fair. Why invest in more personnel when even the most optimistic advertising projections can’t cover the cost? The reason is that this is how you increase the value of your product.

(Source: jaketbrooks)

11 notes

This tumblr is now dead.

h-ash:

If you like this I might see it and follow you if you didn’t catch my new tumblr name.

Just letting you know, I don’t ever check this anymore but I figured I’d post one last time since a few people I care about and forgot have tumblrs didn’t realize why I was gone.

376,877 notes

maxasaurus:

Paul described this gif set to me (not really knowing it’s from DW), saying it’s something like he’ll be as an old man.

Every time I’ve watched episodes in, I think, he’s basically Paul as an Old Man.

(Source: timelocked)

4 notes

During World War II, the company secretly worked with the U. S. government in fabricating special decks to send as gifts for American prisoners of war in German camps. When these cards were moistened, they peeled apart to reveal sections of a map indicating precise escape routes. Also during the war, USPC provided “spotter” cards, which illustrated the characteristic shapes of tanks, ships and aircraft from the more powerful countries. The company further assisted by sewing parachutes for anti-personnel fragmentation bombs
About Bicycle - The History of Bicycle® Playing Cards (via quietbabylon)

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